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Lambretta Model C/LC

Years produced: 1950 - 1951 (C)
Amount produced: 87.500
Engine: 1 cylinder, air cooled 2-stroke
Induction: piston ported
Bore: 52 mm
Stroke: 58 mm
Cubic capacity: 123 cc
Compression ratio: 6:1
BHP at rpm: 4.3 @ 4500
Transmission: 3 speed (foot)
Lubrication: 5%
Carburetor: Dellorto MA 16
Ignition: contact breaker & points
Ignition timing: 26-28 degrees BTDC
Breaker gap: 0.3-0.4 mm
Voltage: 6 volt
Wheel size: 8"
Tire size: 4 x 8
Max speed: 42 mph
Total dry weight: 154 lbs

Years produced: 1950 - 1951 (LC)
Amount produced: 42.500
Engine: 1 cylinder, air cooled 2-stroke
Induction: piston ported
Bore: 52 mm
Stroke: 58 mm
Cubic capacity: 123 cc
Compression ratio: 6:1
BHP at rpm: 4.3 @ 4500
Transmission: 3 speed (hand)
Lubrication: 5%
Carburetor: Dellorto MA 16
Ignition: contact breaker & points
Ignition timing: 26 degrees BTDC
Breaker gap: 0.3-0.4 mm
Voltage: 6 volt
Wheel size: 8"
Tire size: 4 x 8
Max speed: 42 mph
Total dry weight: 176 lbs

 

LAMBRETTA MODEL C/LC HISTORY

In 1950, Innocenti radically renewed the design of the Lambretta and offered, for the first time, two different versions to satisfy of the now huge scooter market. With the popular new C model, it became the most economic scooter on the national market, and still kept its sturdiness, reliability, and overall superior quality.

The steel tube frame was one of the principle esthetic qualities of the new Lambretta. The suspension was thanks to large springs with direct action integrated on both wheels, which were enlarged to 4.00 x 8 inches to further the comfort and road handling. The braking system finally had an overhaul and adopted the traditional system of brake lining mounted on the brake shoes and an aluminum drum that was tightly secured to help to disperse the heat.

The Lambretta C was immediately a favorite with the public, helped by its low selling price, and surpassed even the most rosy predictions of sales. People were lined up in front of the dealers to sign a reservation for a C; usually they had to pay installments before they were the bona fides owner. Production was finally able to keep up with demand. 3,000 units of the Lambretta B had been produced every month, but production of the C and LC soared to between 7,000 to 8,000 scooters monthly.

The success of these two new models was enormous throughout Europe as well. So much that the German company NSU, one of the largest producers of vehicles in the world, asked Innocenti if it could produce Lambrettas under license for the German market. It is interesting to note that within Italy the C was by far the most popular scooter, while abroad the luxurious LC dominated sales even in poorer countries like Morocco and Egypt.

The LC had an elegant body with slender and aerodynamic styling that would protect the rider from the grime of the motor and the weather. The forced air from the fan helped the engine stay cool and give out constant power.

The production of the C series lasted about two years, during which time various technical modifications were introduced such as the gear shifter and the handlebars. The first version could be identified because of the gear shifter box and the levers on the handlebar, which were both identical to the one on the B series. The second version shrunk the handlebar levers to make them easier to use, and the gearbox no longer had a boxy shape but resembled a small shield.

The choice of color schemes was reduced to just three shades, none of them metallic. Both versions of the C series came in a choice of blue, green, and tan; only a few of the very first Lambretta Cs to come off the assembly line were painted dark red like the 125 A.

The plexiglass windscreen was no longer available, but at the same time other features were offered as options: a spare time holder, extra floorboards for the passenger, and a large glovebox which replaced the little one on the Lambretta C.

The C series was the last Lambretta to be sold without a license plate holder in Italy since at the end of 1951, a new law was passed that required motor vehicles with an engine larger than 50cc to be licensed. For this reason, the rear fender was not designed to hold the plate until the D series was introduced. In November 1951, production of the C was halted after more than 100,000 units were made.